Recent Developments in Cancer Research

Funding by the American Cancer Society of some of the country’s most talented and innovative scientist researchers, the Society is proving its dedication to finding cures and fighting back against a disease that has taken too much. Let’s explore some of the most current and promising research that Society-funded researchers have been relentlessly working on to save more lives.
As we travel the path of transformation, it is important to keep in mind why we work at the American Cancer Society – to help save lives by creating a world with less cancer and more birthdays. By funding some of the country’s most talented and innovative scientist researchers, the Society is proving its dedication to finding cures and fighting back against a disease that has taken too much.

Let’s explore some of the most current and promising research that Society-funded researchers have been relentlessly working on to save more lives.
Society grantee talks about the challenges of getting funding – Brian C. Turner, PhD, University of Colorado – Denver, who studies leukemia/lymphoma, discusses the difficulties of getting funding as a postdoctoral fellow and his appreciation of his American Cancer Society grant. 

Society researcher discovers genetic link to esophageal cancer – American Cancer Society Clinical Research Professor Charis Eng, MD, PhD, has identified three genetic mutations that are more common in people with disorders of the esophagus, including cancer.  

Society study finds that treatment for lung cancer varies depending on hospital type – A recent study conducted by Society intramural researcher Katherine S. Virgo, PhD, managing director, Health Services Research, found that lung cancer patients treated in hospitals that care for a high percentage of uninsured and Medicaid-insured patients were significantly less likely to receive surgery that was intended to cure the person compared to patients treated at hospitals that care for low percentages of the uninsured/Medicaid-insured. 

Unlocking the mystery of postpartum breast cancer – Two recently published studies from American Cancer Society grantees Traci R. Lyons, PhD, and Pepper Schedin, PhD, highlight some of the risks of cancer associated with pregnancy, and help untangle the threads between normal and cancerous cells. 

Southern states lag behind Northern states in making progress against colorectal cancer (CRC)–  A recent report by Society intramural researcher Ahmedin Jemal, PhD, vice president, Surveillance Research, and his colleagues shows that progress in reducing CRC mortality rates varies significantly across states, with states in the Northeast showing the most progress and those in the South showing the least progress. Colon cancer screening rates are generally lower in the Southern states than Northern states.